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Thread: Article: Twitter Mailbag: The Fernandez/Kershaw Path

  1. #21
    Banned All-Star
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    Jorge= George....just saying

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seth Stohs View Post
    It's Jorge Felix... people are going to have to bear with me on this one. I've been calling him Felix Jorge for probably three years... It's like when I went to Cedar Rapids for their season opener last year and they were playing Beloit. I'm pretty sure I tweeted Beloit thinking Cedar Rapids over and over again!
    Thanks Seth. Since first seeing your reference to the correction, I have been using Jorge Felix in all my comments over at TT. Also, giving you credit for clarifying our collective mistake. Hopefully, in time we will all get it correct!

  3. #23
    Senior Member Big-Leaguer Monkeypaws's Avatar
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    Some guys move quickly. Sale for example. Hard to explain how a guy drafted 13th overall moved up so fast. Heck, even our own Garza got a sniff pretty quickly. Scouts and coaches probably got their finger on that pulse pretty actively. If they don't get moved up overnight, i am guessing there is a reason.

  4. #24
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    When was the last time the Twins signed an 18 year old Kershaw/Fernandez type? Bert all those years ago?
    Hitter wise, Carew, Hrbek, Gaetti, Puckett, Mauer, Morneau and Cuddyer did not spend a lot of time in the high minors. The Twins had a little success with those guys.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Triple-A
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wise One View Post
    When was the last time the Twins signed an 18 year old Kershaw/Fernandez type? Bert all those years ago?
    Hitter wise, Carew, Hrbek, Gaetti, Puckett, Mauer, Morneau and Cuddyer did not spend a lot of time in the high minors. The Twins had a little success with those guys.
    Morneau had over 1300 plate appearances in AA and AAA before becoming an everyday player at the majors, and Cuddyer had over 1600 PAs in the upper minors. Now part of this was due to being sent back and forth early in their careers, but I would still consider this a lot of time. By comparison, Arcia (454 PAs), Rosario (313 PAs) and Sano (276 PAs) would each need roughly two more full seasons at AA and AAA to match Morneau's time spent in the upper minors.

    I expect Rosario and Sano to be up much sooner than that, but I think it is reasonable to expect them to struggle at the majors for a couple of seasons as they get their bearings.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wise One View Post
    When was the last time the Twins signed an 18 year old Kershaw/Fernandez type? Bert all those years ago?
    Hitter wise, Carew, Hrbek, Gaetti, Puckett, Mauer, Morneau and Cuddyer did not spend a lot of time in the high minors. The Twins had a little success with those guys.
    The Wise One,

    I'm putting together some stuff on this. I was planning on rolling it out before some more Buxton and Sano projections...but might roll it out a little sooner.

    But yes, you're absolutely right.

    Carew, Hrbek, Gaetti and Mauer all went from AA or lower to Opening Day starters and never looked back.

    Puckett spent 1983 at Class A, then in 1984 he went to AAA for a monthwas the every day starting CF for the Twins by mid May.

    Cuddyer got a Sept call up from AA at age 22 (4 seasons in the minors), but ultimately would need parts of 2 seasons at AAA before coming a regular.

    The Twins promoted players aggressively from 1980-1982 and from 1999-2002. Lots of AA jumps to the pros, Sept call-ups, etc.
    Last edited by twinsfan34; 11-18-2013 at 11:20 AM.

  7. #27
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    The biggest problem that the Twins have in "rushing" their prospects to the major league level is management. They simply do not have a manager and coaching staff that is good at developing players. In fact, the current Twins staff appears to me to be uncomfortable with having young players in the lineup. They are intolerant of their mistakes and their behaviours.

    To rebuild a team you need to put the ball in the hands of young pitchers and place young hitters in the lineup that will simply exasperate you. They will make mistakes. But, you have to accept those mistakes as learning opportunities, find ways to correct them, and find out which players cannot improve upon their mistakes. You will lose ball games by the batches. It is investment for the future. The problem with the Twins team going forward, however, is that they have lost all of those ball game without gaining any future value of etting young players experience and weeding out the players that cannot make it. We have lost 95+ game for three consecutive seasons without developing a single player that is a sure bet to help us going into a winning future. That is the saddest commentary possible for the past three years.

  8. #28
    Senior Member All-Star 70charger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shimrod View Post

    A little off topic, but I think it relates. From my outside perspective baseball seems like the most hidebound, insular, and incestuous major sport. Tradition is great but I think many baseball professionals, given the choice between winning and sticking with tradition, would pick tradition every time. I've worked in environments that valued continuity over production and baseball sure looks like another example. In what other sport does every team employ the exact same strategy? Football has multiple offensive and defensive philosophies, west coast, the pistol, the 3-4, the 4-3. Basketball can boast the triangle offense, the corner offense, man or zone, etc. Baseball is stretching its limits with a defensive shift or offensive platoon.

    What I'm getting at is, just because the Twins coaches and managers have been in the game all their adult lives and are experts in their field doesn't mean they're automatically employing the best methods of producing what the fans want to see, a winning ball club. MLB looks like a prime candidate for a paradigm shift. Right now it's stuck in a self-perpetuating rut. No one gets a boss job until they've demonstrated they've internalized every hoary trope of conventional baseball. There is no innovation, at all.

    And as I implied earlier, my paradigm buster would be stomping on the accelerator with the top picks. Meyer should begin the season in the rotation, Stewart should be up by September. Sano should be the opening day third baseman and Buxton should be in centerfield by the all-star break. After three consecutive 90 loss seasons, what do we have to lose? If they fail at the MLB level send them back, and if failure at the major league level is going to permanently impair them they never had the strength of will to succeed anyway. Now's the time to find out, when we can cut our losses and still come out ahead by trading young talented players who were "simply over-promoted" (conventional thinking) for new prospects who may have what it takes to succeed. Slowly working up the promotion ladder a year at a time is fine for low level picks; top talents should be accelerated through the system.
    Although Seth seems to have covered this well, I'll throw in my 2 cents, because my buddy and I were just talking about this while watching the Denver - Kansas City game last night.

    I was of the opinion that baseball was more on the cutting edge than football, at least as it relates to advanced statistics and "playing the odds." Frankly, if you have Peyton Manning anywhere past his own 40 yard line on fourth down and short, you should be going for it. Each and every time.

    The statistics show that the win probability would go up quite a bit if football coaches were less conservative in their play calling. Pretty much every coach is going to punt on fourth down unless they have to go for it. It's almost maddening. Fourth down isn't the only scenario either.

    So speaking of paradigm shifts, if any sport is begging for one it's football. You can make an argument that baseball is too, but I doubt baseball is at all out of the ordinary. And oddly enough, the changes in the respective sports seem to happen in opposite "directions." You're seeing quite a lot of very creative and odds-driven strategy in the high school and increasingly in the college football world. It "trickles up." If anything, the creativity in baseball trickles down from the highest levels.

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